The Trial of God

gives the book of Job such broad appeal is its stark treatment of two claims that seem on the surface to be irreconcilable with one another: (1) that there is a just God who rules the world and upholds it, and (2) that human beings suffer, often so horribly that even the most heartless person would try to help, and yet God seems to do nothing.What gives the book of Job such broad appeal is its stark treatment of two claims that seem on the surface to be irreconcilable with one another: (1) that there is a just God who rules the world and upholds it, and (2) that human beings suffer, often so horribly that even the most heartless person would try to help, and yet God seems to do nothing.

Face of God

Abraham and Sarah had a son, Isaac. Isaac and Rebekah had twins, Esau and Jacob. Esau was the oldest, he came out first and Jacob right after, hanging onto his brother’s heel. They fought in the womb and they kept on fighting throughout their lives. But Jacob took things a bit too far. He stole his brother’s inheritance and his father’s blessing. Esau vowed to kill him. And so, Jacob had to flee.

A Mustard Seed of Faith Can Transform This World

Leading up to our Gospel today, Jesus has a long series of parables and sayings that are rather difficult. We have heard several of them over the past few weeks, like the parable of the dishonest manager, and the parable of Lazarus and the rich man. The lectionary has also skipped a bunch to move us along: the saying about the millstone, the huge number of times we are to forgive somebody, adultery, justification. All of these are very challenging sayings and stories. In this section, which is about two or two and a half chapters long, it is pretty much just Jesus talking. The disciples can’t get a word in edgewise.